The Most Exciting Green Startups To Watch In 2020

The Airbnb of energy, the Uber of zero-carbon transportation, the VRBO of blockchain electricity-sharing… a collection of new startups are about to revolutionize the sharing economy – and smart money is starting to pay attention.

The sharing economy has become an unstoppable force–and the collaborative, peer-to-peer economy has grown from a curious fad into the trend-to-beat-all-trends over the past decade.

Popularized by ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft; home-rental companies like Airbnb and HomeAway; and crowdfunding apps like Kickstarter and Fundablem, this economy has transformed into one of the fastest-growing business trends in history.

McKinsey now estimates that 162 million people or 20-30% of the workforce in the U.S. and Europe alone are providers on sharing platforms.

The latest startups making huge waves and threatening to disrupt sharing as we know it include a Slovak outfit that is fashioning itself as the Airbnb of clean energy …

A Canadian startup that meets the widespread demand for a green ride-sharing solution by giving consumers a choice of vehicle and by contributing to planting a tree for every ride ..

And an Australian peer-to-peer energy trading platform that is storming the renewable energy halls of Silicon Valley.

All three combine the best of IT with the biggest of trends: sharing and environmentally responsible investing.

Meet the three startups rewriting all the rules:

#1 Fuergy

Slovak startup Fuergy plans to turn household renewable energy-sharing into a reality.

One of the latest is a Slovakian startup that is now fashioning itself as the Airbnb of clean energy, with a mission to turn household renewable energy sharing into a reality.

Using the Fuergy platform, home users who generate surplus solar or wind power can sell it directly to other members in their community instead of the usual model of feeding it to the grid.

This way, the consumer bypasses high processing fees thus allowing them to earn more from their renewables. Meanwhile, the buyers are able to purchase the shared energy at cheaper rates than buying it from the main grid–a classic win-win for both the seller and the buyer.

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